Cliff Seafoot

Cliff was an outstanding catcher in his prime, and in his later years he played third, first and was a designated hitter with Riverside Canucks. Cliff was named the M.S.B.L. first all-star team 14 times, played on six M.S.B.L. championship teams and five Manitoba championship teams. Cliff was M.S.B.L. MVP in 1964 and 1970, and won the league batting title in 1972 with a .394 average. Cliff`s average over 25 years was .314. Seafoot was also a very good goalie with the Souris Elks in hockey. He was considered a great team player in both baseball and hockey.

 

 

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Article, 1970

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Article, 1971

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Articles, 1972

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Article, (2) 1972

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Article, (3) 1972

Cliff Seafoot Newspaper Article, 1974

These articles are gathered from University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, Winnipeg Tribune Collection

Al Robertson

Al Robertson was an excellent player and builder in baseball. Robertson was the M.S.B.L. batting champ in 1967 when he hit .395, and was on the M.S.B.L. all-star team 12 times. Al was the M.S.B.L. President from 1982 to 1984, M.B.A. coach of the year in 1985, M.B.A. President in 1970-71, and member of M.B.A. Honour Society (1988). Robertson batted .482 for Team Canada at 1967 Pan Am Games. In 1985 Al was named Western Manitoba Sportsman of the Year, and becamse a member of the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bill Murray

Bill Murray started to play with the Hungry Nine (players from 7 communities; Foxwarren, Kelloe, Vista, Oakburn, Solsgirth, Shoal Lake and Russell) at 14 years old. In 1948 Bill joined Gilbert Plains to play in the Northern League and the Manitoba-Saskatchewan League, and later joined Dauphin Redbirds in M.S.B.L.. Bill was an outstanding shortstop and hitter, great competito and sportsman. Murray also excelled in hockey, curling, golf.

George Merlevede

George was an excellent pitcher, shortstop, and hitter. In 1935 he played in a Winnipeg school league. He joined Fort Rouge Cubs in juvenile ball for 1936 and 1937, then in 1938 went to West End Maroons and St. Boniface Native Sons. In 1940 and 1941 he was offered contracts with US teams, but in 1941 he joined the Canadian Army and pitched in the Pacific Coast Service League. After the war he returned to Winnipeg and played with Native Sons in 1946, Reo Rods in 1947 and 1948, Native Sons in 1949, Transcona in 1950, and league champion Native Sons in 1951. Also played tournaments through the years with St. Anne, St. Claude, and Fannystelle. Coached in Parochial League. Held different administration positions in senior and minor baseball from late 50s to mid 60s, including President of Winnipeg Senior League, 1963-64.

Carl Mattson

Carl was a strong right-handed pitcher with an outstanding fastball and control. Carl was a good hitter and a versatile player in the field. He played junior with Norwood (1945) and Elmwood (1946, 1947), and then played with A.N.A.F. Vets in ManDak League, and senior ball with C.U.A.C., Selkirk, and St. Boniface. Carl played in many tournaments with the Winnipeg “Eagles.” Mattson also coached community club baseball in Norwood and Glenwood.

Ed Leier

Ed was a great infielder-outfielder, a high average hitter, and a speedy baserunner. Ed started in 1943 with Morse Place juniors and excelled for nine years in junior and senior leagues, especially with Elmwood and C.U.A.C. Ed was named to junior league all-star team in 1946 and 1947, and an all-star in 1950 in ManDak League. Ed was well-known as an all-round athlete, a professional hockey player from 1949-1956, and provincial champion in 100 and 200 yard dashes.

Alex Kurceba

Alex Kurceba played for 17 years (from 1943-60) with the Morse Place Juniors, Elmwood Giants, Winnipeg Reo Rods, Swan River, International Falls, and the Dauphin Redbirds. Kurceba was a good hitter, and a very good catcher-outfielder with a strong and accurate throwing arm. In the 1947 Junior All-Star Game, in front of 5,000 fans at Osborne Stadium, Kurceba led the North Division with four hits. Alex also played against prominent touring teams such as the House of David and Satchel Paige`s all-stars. Kurceba also had a great hockey career for 25 years, including a Fort Frances Canadians Allan Cup victory. Kurceba was inducted into Northwestern (Ontario) Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.

Bill Kirkup

Bill was the President of the Souris Cardinals from 1964-73, coached the Souris Cardinals 1967 Western Canada Juvenile champs, and the Manitoba Junior finalists in 1968 and 1969. Kirkup was the founding President of Western Manitoba Bison Baseball League, chair of the Western Canada Juvenile championship in 1972, and coached local entry. Bill was the driving force behind construction of Mote Field in Souris. Kirkup was the M.S.B.L. director for many years, V.P. for 4 years, and President in 1988 and 1989. Bill was also the former president of Souris Minor Hockey & AAA Midget Southwest Cougars.

Mike Genthon

Mike Genthon was born at Rembrandt (in Gimli district)and started his 25 year pitching career in 1932. He was a southpaw hurler and played for St. Charles, St. James, and the C.U.A.C. Blues prior to World War II. Later Genthon starred for a Navy team during the War. He also pitched for Selkirk, Transcona, St. Boniface Native Sons, Sacred Heart and several rural teams such as Fannystelle and Lundar in tournaments. Along with Les Edwards, another Manitoban, Genthon played for three months with the House of David, after the bearded wonders had lost two regular pitchers who were injured in a bus accident.

Leighton Downey

Leighton “Tiny” Downey was an outstanding pitcher in the Coultervale district in the late 1930s and in the 1940s. Leighton often pitched with the strong Coultervale team during the week and with Westhope, North Dakota on Sunday because Sunday ball was not allowed in Manitoba. Leighton once struck out 19 in a game at Carievale, Saskatchewan. Leighton became a left-hander after his right arm was done, and later after his playing career, he became a respected umpire.